26 marzo 2013

White City of Tel-Aviv

Picture from World Heritage Sites

Esiste a Tel-Aviv un esperimento di città del Movimento Moderno, sul solco della tradizione e nel rispetto dei caratteri locali, completamente diverso dal funzionalismo della Carta di Atene e dai grandi quartieri dormitorio a stecche e torri.

Tel-Aviv white city
In July, 2003, UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, proclaimed "The White City", the unique urban and historical fabric of Tel Aviv-Jaffa, as a World Cultural Heritage site. By this proclamation, the world recognized the special architectural qualities of the buildings, streets, squares and avenues of Tel Aviv...
"The White City", the world's largest grouping of buildings in the International Style, also known as Bauhaus, was planned by Sir Patrick Geddes. About 4,000 buildings were constructed in this area, beginning in the 1930's until the establishment of the State of Israel...
The buildings of "The White City" were designed by Jewish architects, who had studied in Europe before their immigration to Palestine, which later became the State of Israel. This group created a new architectural language, which is rich and diverse, characterized by its asymmetry, functionality and simplicity. The balconies, building pillars, flat roofs and "thermometer" windows became the trademarks of the city...


© UNESCO Author: Yvon Fruneau 

Tel Aviv was founded in 1909 and developed as a metropolitan city under the British Mandate in Palestine. The White City was constructed from the early 1930s until the 1950s, based on the urban plan by Sir Patrick Geddes, reflecting modern organic planning principles. The buildings were designed by architects who were trained in Europe where they practised their profession before immigrating. They created an outstanding architectural ensemble of the Modern Movement in a new cultural context...
The White City of Tel-Aviv is a synthesis of outstanding significance of the various trends of the Modern Movement in architecture and town planning in the early part of the 20th century. Such influences were adapted to the cultural and climatic conditions of the place, as well as being integrated with local traditions...
...The buildings are characterized by the implementation of the Modernist ideas into the local conditions. The large glazed surfaces of European buildings are reduced to relatively small and strip window openings, more suitable for the hot weather. Many buildings have pilotis, as in Le Corbusier's design, allowing the sea breeze to come through. Other elements include the brise-soleil to cut direct sunlight; the deep balconies served the same purpose, giving shade, as well as adding to the plasticity of the architecture. The flat roofs were paved and could be used for social purposes. A characteristic feature is the use of curbed corners and balconies, expressive of Mendelsohn's architecture...